Information from the Red Cross

After a disaster strikes your community, you may be left feeling disoriented. Not only will you need to be aware of possible post-disaster dangers, but you may need to access damages and repair your home.

Picking up the Pieces After a Disaster

The American Red Cross has prepared this information to encourage you take precautions to help keep you safe and speed your recovery after a disaster. You will also find ideas on what you can do to help make yourself and your home safer from future disasters. more...

Water Treatment

In addition to having a bad odor, and taste, water from questionable sources may be contaminated by a variety of microorganisms. more...

Food Safety

Perishable foods should not be held above 40 degrees for more than 2 hours. more...

Generators

If you choose to buy a generator, make sure you get one that is listed with the Underwriter’s Laboratory (UL) or Factory Mutual (FM). more...

Recovering Financially

A disaster can cause significant financial loss. Take the time now to assess your situation and ask questions. more...

Chemical Emergencies

Return home only when authorities say it is safe. more...

Earthquakes

Check yourself for injuries. Often people tend to others without checking their own injuries. more...

Fires

Give first aid where needed. After calling 9-1-1 or your local emergency number, cool and cover burns, which reduces the chance of further injury or infection.
Picking Up The Pieces After a Fire - PDF

Floods
Your home and its contents may look beyond hope, but many of your belongings can be restored.
Important Steps in flood recovery
Repairing Your Flooded Home

Heat Waves

Heat stroke is a life-threatening situation. Help is needed fast. Call 9-1-1 or your local emergency number. more...

Hurricanes

Continue listening to local radio or television stations or a NOAA Weather Radio for information and instructions. Access may be limited to some parts of the community, or roads may be blocked. more...

Thunderstorms

Continue listening to local radio or television stations or a NOAA Weather Radio for updated information and instructions. Access may be limited to some parts of the community, or roads may be blocked. more...

Tornadoes

Watch out for fallen power lines or broken gas lines and report them to the utility company immediately. more...

Tsunami

Continue listening to a NOAA Weather Radio, Coast Guard emergency frequency station, or other reliable source for emergency information. The tsunami may have damaged roads, bridges, or other places that may be unsafe. more...

Wild Fires

Use caution and exercise good judgment when re-entering a burned wildland area. Hazards may still exist, including hot spots, which can flare up without warning. more...

Winter Storms

Before the onset of cold weather, prevent freezing of these water supply lines and pipes by following these recommendations. more...

Weather